Easy Ways to Make Small Spaces

Small spaces are the bane of practically any city-dweller’s existence. And when you’re living in a minuscule apartment or home, figuring out how to make the most of your square footage is essential. Thankfully, inventive interior designers and architects have long devised solutions—from paint finishes to light fixtures—for making small spaces feel big (or at least bigger). Phillip Thomas’s petite room at this year’s Kips Bay Decorator Showhouse is chock-full of small-space ideas. We caught up with the New York–based interior designer for his tips on living large in a tight spot.

Create a glossy ceiling. “With the right finish, a ceiling can make a room feel bigger. At Kips Bay, we chose to use a decorative plaster finish that adds sheen. The finish helps to move light around the space and create the illusion of height.”

Add glass. “Glass can also be a wonderful way of making a space feel larger. In our daybed nook at Kips Bay, we used laminated glass panels by Galaxy Glass, consisting of a layer of frosted mirror and of frosted clear glass with a metallic gauze interlining. The

High Style Hamptons Houses

Since the late 19th century, Manhattanites have been fleeing the sticky heat of the city each summer for the breezy coast of Long Island. In fact, a 1983 article in The New York Times deemed the cluster of villages around old Southampton “as close an approach to Eden as can be found in a long journey,” noting also that “well-bred men and women find a congenial atmosphere, refined attractions in plenty.” And if you’ve ever caught an episode of Seinfeld, Sex and the City, or The Real Housewives of New York, you might note that not a lot has changed. So for those of you dreaming about your entrée into Hamptons real estate—or perhaps just researching a summer timeshare—we’ve rounded up the best-looking homes from the pages of AD, from a multicolor modern abode in Hampton Bays to a Shingle Style beauty in East Hampton.

Nearly 20 years after it was built, Shelton, Mindel & Assoc. gave this Colonial Revival Hamptons home by Robert A.M. Stern a vibrant refresh, leaving most of the structure and its classical detailing in place.

After living for more

Creating Homes For the Kardashians

Jeff Andrews is perfectly happy discussing the many homes he’s designed for titans of entertainment and sports. His celebrity clients include a fistful of Kardashians and Jenners, a beloved television serial killer, and one of the NBA’s most dapper Goliaths. Yet Andrews never seems blinded by the superhigh wattage of the luminaries on his roster—he’s not particularly interested in the orgy of fabulousness that permeates pop culture. He’s all about the collaboration between himself and the client—whoever that client may be—and the process of bringing a home to life. The rest, he says, is “just noise.” I recently caught up with the globetrotting designer in his lofty new office on Beverly Boulevard in Los Angeles. Freshly returned from some foreign port of call, he sat down for a wide-ranging chat that skipped from his background in dance to his present thoughts on Dubai.

Jeff Andrews: I grew up in and around San Bernardino, in California’s Inland Empire. I started dancing when I was 15, and I got a scholarship to study dance in Los Angeles. After that, I danced professionally for a while, then

Penthouse Transformation Ideas

A walk-in closet with endless shoe storage, a skyline view, outdoor space—in Manhattan, amenities like these take on Holy Grail status. So when designer Wesley Moon’s clients commissioned him to design their fixer-upper of an Upper West Side pied-à-terre with an enormous wraparound terrace, the idea of bringing the outdoors in was suddenly reversed to highlight the benefit. “We wanted the terrace to feel like a natural extension of the inside to make the narrow interior spaces feel more expansive and cohesive,” says Moon.

The best way to do that: light. Moon covered the home’s walls in soothing shades and chose texture over pattern to create a retreatlike atmosphere for the world-traveling homeowners. “The whole space glows because we used warm tones and some key reflective surfaces,” says Moon. “So when you’re inside, you sort of get the feeling you’re floating on a cloud.” To enhance the effect, Moon removed a closet to expand the kitchen’s footprint, adding quartzite countertops and replacing upper cabinet fronts with opaque textured-glass panels. “They make the space feel lighter while adding a glamorous element,” says Moon.

The seamless indoor-outdoor transition suited Moon’s concept for the dilapidated terrace, which is visible from most rooms thanks to expansive

How to Find Chic London Apartment Is for Sale

London’s stylish Mayfair neighborhood just got a serious dose of design—an entire apartment full, to be exact—as Nina Yashar, of Milanese gallery Nilufar and its sprawling warehouse adjunct, Nilufar Depot, moved a portion of her vast furnishings collection into a refurbished Victorian apartment on South Audley Street. The installation—a collaboration with interior design and architecture firm Shalini Misra on display through October—marks the fifth iteration of Nilufar Squat, Yashar’s version of a pop-up shop that feels a lot more like a swanky apartment, decorated with a mix of blue-chip 20th-century design collectibles, contemporary furniture, and museum-worthy artworks.

The only difference? Everything in the three-bedroom apartment—from the Gio Ponti chairs in the dining room to the Henri Matisse painting in the reception room—is for sale. The furnishings were valued at £1.5 million, and the apartment listed at £10.9 million. Set aside a few more millions if you want to take the art—a collection that includes works by Lucio Fontana and Julian Schnabel.

“I have always been interested in creating new and unexpected associations between furniture and space,” Yashar said in a statement. “I like changes and challenges, which is why I decided to bring Squat to different cities around the world.”

Nilufar Squat, 70

Banquette Ideas to Elevate Any Kitchen Design

Naomi Watts has one. So does Patrick Dempsey. But star power aside, there are plenty of reasons to install a banquette in your kitchen or breakfast nook. More than just a bold design treatment, the cozy construction makes for a seating arrangement that’s more conducive to intimate conversation than the traditional table-and-chairs setup, much like the corner booth at your favorite restaurant. It’s also a great choice for families, as anyone who’s ever tried to get a squirming kid to sit still in a single seat can attest. Whether upholstered in a cheerful patterned fabric or classic leather, banquettes can even make a big impact in smaller spaces, where there’s limited room for a full dining area. Here, we’ve rounded up 12 stunning banquettes that will inspire you. From modernist benches to cushy booths, there’s one to suit every style.

The banquette and Saarinen chairs in accessories designer Fiona Kotur’s kitchen in Hong Kong are cushioned in a DeLany & Long outdoor leather.

Designed by Campion Platt, the sunny breakfast nook in a Hudson Valley, New York, home features a banquette in a Kravet vinyl, leather chairs from Ralph Lauren Home, and a custom wood-grained-vinyl area rug by Patterson, Flynn & Martin.

In

Outdoor Lighting Tips

Your outdoor space may be built around making the most of natural light, but come nightfall the glow of the moon and fireflies will only get you so far. If you want to dine alfresco—or simply illuminate your entryway for late-night guests—you’ll need to find some outdoor lighting to suit your terrace, porch, or patio. Try a wrought-iron pendant or a statement chandelier over the dining area. Or flank the front door with wall-mounted lanterns. For a real statement, try a group of two or three on the porch or covered patio. Just remember to make sure a fixture is damp rated to accommodate your outdoor setting—covered or not. Here, we’ve collected some instructional examples from the AD archives.

The outdoor dining area at Michelle Pitcher’s Palladian-inspired villa in San José del Cabo, Mexico, is crowned with a chandelier by Formations.

Architect John Murray and decorator Elissa Cullman employed a glass cube lantern in this pergola-topped outdoor dining area in a Manhattan penthouse.

A wrought-iron lantern illuminates the 18th-century French stone doorway of designer and antiques dealer Richard Shapiro’s Malibu, California, retreat.
The rear

Warmth and offer privacy

Originally intended to conserve warmth and offer privacy, canopy beds are now beloved for their sumptuous design. These beds, typically four-posters, feature fabric draped over the top and on all sides, often finished with tassels or other details to add drama. From a simple, sheer surround to an over-the-top lit à la polonaise, these canopy beds from the AD archives make a good night’s sleep more luxurious than ever.

Cole Park, the manor that designer Anouska Hempel shares with her husband, Sir Mark Weinberg, in the countryside of Wiltshire, England, dates from the mid-16th century. In the master bedroom, a J. Robert Scott stripe is used for the ebony-and-gilt canopy bed.

For her English manor home, designer Anouska Hempel conceived the Oriel Room’s bed, which is wrapped in burlap, velvet, and rope cord.

At Easton Neston, in Northamptonshire, England—the 1702 house by Nicholas Hawksmoor owned by fashion designer Leon Max, who restored it with Ptolemy Dean Architects and Spencer-Churchill Designs—the Tapestry Bedroom features a George III mahogany bed with a custom-printed linen canopy; the carpet is a 19th-century Sultanabad.

Designer Peter Dunham worked with Steve Tisch on the redecoration of his 1932 Paul Williams house in Beverly Hills, California. The hand-carved canopy bed in

Pantry Ideas for a Seriously Stylis

The key to a spotless kitchen is a well-organized pantry. These two spaces make a perfect team, with the kitchen doing the heavy lifting in terms of prep and the pantry providing plenty of room to stash tools, ingredients, and serving pieces. While storage is the centerpiece of the pantry and should be the main consideration when it comes to design, the space can do double duty as a bar or a secondary prep area for food and floral arrangements. It can also serve as a showcase for collections of glassware and china, on open shelving, in glass-front cabinets, or even on the wall. See how Steven Gambrel, Barbara Westbrook, Ray Booth, and other designers have created highly organized and beautifully functional pantry spaces.

In the pantry of a Bridgehampton, New York, home designed by Steven Gambrel, a white-oak ladder by Putnam Rolling Ladder Co. makes the tall shelves easily accessible; polished-nickel pendant lamps by Hudson Valley Lighting illuminate the space.

Antique Wedgwood and Coalport china is stored in the pantry of architect Jim Joseph and musical theater composer Scott Frankel’s upstate New York home.

The pantry of architect Alison Spear’s Hudson Valley, New York, home is outfitted with a 1930s pendant light

Easy Ways to Make Your Home a Makeover

Being an interiors journalist has given Claire Bingham insider access to many incredible homes, and she’s learned a thing or two about great design along the way. In her new book, Modern Living: How to Decorate with Style (TeNeues, $55), she reveals how to think like the top interior designers whose work she’s witnessed. “Yes, you can devise a scheme based around a gorgeous new cushion, but it is best to think less about colors or details. Focus more on the mood and emotion, instead. Homes should make you happy,” Bingham writes. She walks us through the decorating process room by room, with tips and tricks for overhauling a space or just making a few quick upgrades. Here, we share some of her most memorable pieces of advice.

Once you’ve come up with an overall idea for your living room and determined your furniture needs (and where those pieces will go), it’s all about adding character, says Bingham. Here, an old sofa was reupholstered in a funky floral fabric that matches the wallpaper.

“Comfort comes first in the bedroom, so make your bed the priority,” writes Bingham. “Go for extra wide and get the best mattress you can afford. To make your

Home Virtual Decorator

Over the last few years, the rise of online decorating services has made a once-rarefied world much more accessible. Companies that offer personalized, virtual interior design ideas—Laurel & Wolf, Home Polish, Decorist, and Havenly, to name a few—have made hiring a decorator as easy as shopping for shoes online. It no longer requires deep pockets, a lengthy research process, or even an in-person meeting. But is online decorating right for everyone—or every room? We turned to a couple of experts to find out how to get the most out of the experience, and get the (real life) space of your dreams.

DO the groundwork
The more information you can provide from the outset, the better. Complete the online quizzes and style assessments to hone in on the look you’re going for. And when it comes to describing your current space, go overboard. “More is more when it comes to working virtually,” says Kimberly Winthrop, a designer with Laurel & Wolf. “The more communication, photos, measurements, and inspiration references, the better your designer will know you and the better your project will flow.” In addition to taking full-room shots, “take photos of details that make your space unique, like moldings, so that

Design Rules That Miles Redd Loves

In the world of interior design, decorating rules often become so embedded they are second nature—but not for everyone. We’re looking to those boundary-pushing talents to find out the popular design ideas they’re ready to move on from, and what they are trying out instead. First up: Miles Redd, who defies easy labels, bringing his own special blend of glamour and wit to every project. Whether he’s decorating a tropical vacation home or a Texas mansion, the New York designer can always be counted on to defy conventions. We turned to Redd, the former creative director of Oscar de la Renta and author of The Big Book of Chic, to learn which design rules he thinks were made to be broken.

Rule to break: Use color in small doses

“Often when I flip through a catalogue, it would appear we live in a world of beige, a great big bowl of coffee ice cream,” says Redd. The designer prefers to embrace rich hues, as in this windowless entryway “where it appears glittering rather than dull like dishwater.”
“I think people see tiny rooms and they think they need tiny furniture, but often one large thing kissing the ceiling will expand the

How to Incorporate Technology into Your Kitchen

A little more than a decade ago the world met Lo Bosworth—Lauren Conrad’s sweet-as-pie best friend—on the hit MTV series Laguna Beach and, a few years later, The Hills. These days you won’t find Bosworth tiffing with her friends on reality TV, but you can tune in to one of many videos on her new lifestyle blog, TheLoDown, for an afternoon of baking or making breakfast quiche. And after all, wasn’t Bosworth the cast member you always wished you could hang out in the kitchen with?

With a childhood spent cooking at her mother’s side—“She makes dinner from scratch almost every single night of the week,”—and a degree from the French Culinary Institute that sealed the deal, Bosworth is right at home in the lifestyle blogosphere. And while the New Yorker can’t say she cooks every day, she spends a lot of time in the kitchen on summer weekends out in the Hamptons. “You don’t have Seamless on your phone, so you have to go to the store and make meals for yourself,” she laughs. “It’s such a delightful way to eat healthy and cook seasonally.” Bosworth says her diet revolves mostly around lean proteins and seasonal vegetables—though she occasionally indulges

Virtual House Reality

Today marks the launch of The People’s House: Inside the White House with Barack and Michelle Obama, the first-ever Facebook 360 project filmed inside the world’s most famous home. The piece, produced by Emmy-winning cinematic virtual reality creators Félix & Paul Studios alongside the Oculus team at Facebook, takes viewers to nine famous areas within the iconic building—from sitting with the President in the Oval Office to walking around the Situation Room to stopping into the Old Family Dining Room with Mrs. Obama.

“Michelle and I always joke, ‘We’re just renters here. ’ . . . The owners are the American people and all those invested in creating this amazing place with so much history,” President Obama says in the VR experience. “What we wanted to do is make sure that everybody felt they had access to the White House, . . . that as many people as possible could come in and appreciate the place where Lincoln, FDR, or Reagan made the decisions that helped to shape America.”

Of course, collecting wine as a hobby is going to cost you—so it might not be a shock that Spiral Cellars run between $23,000 and $67,000 each. Take a deeper look at what goes into making one

Spectacular Green Roofs

Green roofs are sprouting up more and more on buildings around the world, from private residences and schools to cultural institutions and businesses. Made with hardy varieties of succulents, grasses, wildflowers, and herbs atop several structural layers—including a waterproof membrane and levels for drainage, insulation, and filtering—these self-sustaining living architectural features can bring natural beauty to urban buildings or connect rural structures to their surrounding landscapes. The sky-high functional gardens also have a wide variety of ecological benefits, such as the ability to absorb carbon dioxide, reduce stormwater runoff, limit heat absorption, and provide habitats for insects, birds, and other wildlife. Factor in lower heating and cooling costs, extended roof life, and tax incentives (depending on the city), and it’s easy to see why this building trend continues to grow. Click through these spectacular examples from San Francisco to Singapore to discover how top architects—including Pritzker Prize winner Renzo Piano and AD Innovator Weiss/Manfredi—are incorporating green roofs into their projects.

Green roofs are sprouting up more and more on buildings around the world, from private residences and schools to cultural institutions and businesses. Made with hardy varieties of succulents, grasses, wildflowers, and herbs atop several structural layers—including a waterproof membrane and

Museum Influenced This Classic Fifth Avenue Apartment

Though designer Marshall Watson was delighted with his new project’s location—in a pedigreed building with direct views of the Metropolitan Museum of Art’s Beaux Arts façade and into its galleries of classical antiquities—the space, as he found it, was far from problem-free. It had a palatial “head” (entry hall and double parlor), but the body, toward the natural light–deficient back, was disproportionately restrained, thanks to a subdivision some years prior.

“No surprise: our major inspiration lay just across the street,” says Marshall, whose new book, The Art of Elegance: Classic Interiors (Rizzoli New York, $55), will be released on March 14. “Since the apartment looked directly into into the museum’s Greek and Roman galleries, we decided that the residence would be a de facto extension of them.” So Marshall, a designer renowned for his meticulously researched interiors, set to work with the owners’ architect, reapportioning oversize public rooms, creating new spaces: a half bath, a prelude to the master suite, a library, and passages connecting each. With an eye toward getting the best use of natural light, the parlor, library, and bedroom were all positioned along Fifth Avenue, while the formal dining room, occupied almost exclusively at night, was set on

The Luxurious Way People Are Now Storing Their Wine

Wine cellars are a luxury most city dwellers don’t expect to find in a home, but soon that might change. To make the amenity more accessible, one company is digging deep, literally. Spiral Cellars specialize in exactly what their name suggests—vertical wine cellars that are wrapped around a cylindrical opening beneath your floorboards. The design, created from engineered concrete, allows for the storage of 1,900 bottles of wine, without compromising on square footage.

It’s a wine lover’s dream, as it’s not only an über-luxurious way of showcasing your collection, it’s also practical. The storage unit has a commercial-grade climate-control system, which means that bottles can be kept at the ideal temperature as the ventilation setup swaps out warm air for cold.

Best of all, though, is how easy the unit is to install. The in-home process only takes three to nine days when done by Spiral Cellars. Plus, it doesn’t require any foundation work or breaking into belowground, as it can be housed within a basement or crawlspace.

Of course, collecting wine as a hobby is going to cost you—so it might not be a shock that Spiral Cellars run between $23,000 and $67,000 each. Take a deeper look at what goes into

The Exclusive Seaside Home View

Sitting on 425 acres of verdant land in Vero Beach, Florida, is the luxury residential community of Windsor. It was founded in 1989 by Canadian businessman W. Galen Weston and his philanthropist wife, Hilary Weston, the former lieutenant governor of Ontario. The Westons had been searching for a more permanent warm-weather home for themselves and their children after renting a retreat in the Bahamas. At the recommendation of Mr. Weston’s father, they chose Florida, and Vero Beach was the perfect locale for their dream seaside village. After building a couple of homes and a private polo field (Mr. Weston is an avid fan of the sport) for themselves, they enlisted Andrés Duany and Elizabeth Plater-Zyberk to design Windsor in the New Urbanism style of living, making it a pedestrian-friendly neighborhood with a focus on community and public spaces.

Windsor comprise 350 palatial homes—Anglo-Caribbean residences designed by power hitters such as AD100 firm Jacobsen Architecture and Merrill, Pastor & Colgan Architects. Meanwhile, residents include the likes of the Swarovskis, tennis player Ivan Lendl, businessman Pete Peterson, and of course the Westons. As you cruise around on a golf cart or bike your way through palm tree–lined streets, the vibe is Charleston meets

Home Products You Need

With the popularity of smart speakers like the Amazon Echo and Google Home on the rise comes an influx of other products designed to make your home a little smarter. Whether you want some extra help in the kitchen or a way to monitor your pets when you aren’t home, there is a smart home product for all of your needs. From a refrigerator equipped with a touchscreen for looking up recipes to a sleep machine that analyzes your bedroom to create a “sound blanket,” these seven devices will take your home to the next level in 2017.

With features like two-way talk and one-way video, smart visitor detection, and notifications right to your phone, Vivint’s doorbell camera makes knowing who’s at your front door easy, whether you’re upstairs or out of town. Monthly plans start at $40.

Master the sous vide method with the Anova Precision Cooker. Easily attachable to any pot, the device allows for flavorful, expertly cooked meals every time by using temperature control. Download Anova’s app for tips and hundreds of recipes for every skill level; $149.

Designed for light sleepers, Nightingale works with the acoustics of your room and your existing sleeping conditions (like snoring) to diffuse sound

Cork Can Be a Beautiful and Practical Design Practice

Cork has taken a few stops on its winding journey to showstopping interior design element: From the wine industry as bottle-stoppers (its most common and most lucrative use), then to badminton shuttlecocks and bulletin boards, next to a purely functional use in architecture as sub-flooring and insulation, and finally the walls, ceilings and floors in the homes featured in AD. The woody material’s pragmatic use in architecture is well deserved because of its elastic, cellular structure, its thermal-regulating and soundproofing qualities, and its natural resistance to fire, but it’s the cork’s natural warm hue and subtly dappled texture that are the secret to its modern design success. The versatile material can be dyed or painted (and still maintain its speckled look), it can be applied to walls and ceilings, and its inherent durability make it a prime choice for floors. Here, AD explores the varied uses of cork in spaces like one of Seth Meyers’s dressing rooms, a summer house designed by Thom Filicia, and the modernist home of GQ‘s Fred Woodward.

Designed by Ashe + Leandro, a dressing room backstage at Late Night: Seth Meyers features the warm, natural texture of a cork wall covering by Wolf-Gordon. The space, which